Launched in 1910 from the American Shipbuilding Company in Lorain, Ohio, the Charles S. Price was an imposing site. Her length was 524 feet, beam of 54 feet and a solid gross weight of 6322 gross tons. While she only served the Great Lakes a short 3 years, she worked hard and provided...

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Launched in 1886 as a proud product of the Mt. Clemons, MI shipbuilding industry, the Canisteo was a sight of a wooden steamer with a solid length of 191 feet. She served proudly on the Great Lakes for well over three decades. Sadly, in October of 1920, she was burned and scuttled, left...

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Built and launched in 1854 from Sheboygan, Wisconsin, the F.B. Gardner was originally designed to be a brigantine. At an original length of 137 feet and a weight of just over 400 gross tons, she was rebuilt twice in her five decades of service to the Great Lakes. In 1866, she was rebuilt/redesigned...

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The Eliza H. Strong was a wooden steamer built and launched in 1874. In her three decades of dedicated service on the Great Lakes she was actually sunk three times. The first two times, she was refloated, repaired and quickly put back into service. The third and final sinking occured on October 26,...

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In 1864, the 110 foot schooner, Col. A.B. Williams was lost in a storm while carrying a full load of coal. Often credited with being the oldest known shipwreck in the Port Sanilac area, she lay dormant and undiscovered on the bottom of Lake Huron until nearly a century later. Discovered by a...

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Launched in 1889 as a steel hulled package freighter with an imposing length of 300 feet, the North Star served diligently on the Great Lakes for just over two decades. In November of 1908, she was bound for Duluth in the fog when she collided with her sister ship, the Northern Queen. As...

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The Mary Alice B was built at Duluth, Minnesota in 1931 for the Corps of Engineers as the "Quintus". In 1962 she passed into private ownership and her name was changed. She was a fair sized working tugboat at 62 feet in length. She foundered off Port Sanilac September 5, 1975. She is upright and...

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Launched in 1856 as a proud product of the Buffalo, New York shipbuilding industry, the New York was a wooden steamer. She saw just over two decades of active and faithful service on the Great Lakes before she was sadly lost to a storm and heavy seas in October of 1876. She now...

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Built and launched in 1870, the Checotah was a schooner that served the Great Lakes proudly for two and a half decades until she met her demise. Oddly enough, during that time, she was actually sunk, refloated and repaired before her final voyage. In 1882, she was sunk and repaired, then converted into...

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Having the honor of being the first steel tug on the Great Lakes, the Sport was launched in 1873 from Wyandotte, Michigan. At 57 feet, she was small but powerful. All in all, she saw well over four decades of faithful service on the Great Lakes while operated by multiple owners. She met...

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