Launched in 1886 as a proud product of the Mt. Clemons, MI shipbuilding industry, the Canisteo was a sight of a wooden steamer with a solid length of 191 feet. She served proudly on the Great Lakes for well over three decades. Sadly, in October of 1920, she was burned and scuttled, left...

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Built and launched in 1854 from Sheboygan, Wisconsin, the F.B. Gardner was originally designed to be a brigantine. At an original length of 137 feet and a weight of just over 400 gross tons, she was rebuilt twice in her five decades of service to the Great Lakes. In 1866, she was rebuilt/redesigned...

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The Eliza H. Strong was a wooden steamer built and launched in 1874. In her three decades of dedicated service on the Great Lakes she was actually sunk three times. The first two times, she was refloated, repaired and quickly put back into service. The third and final sinking occured on October 26,...

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Having the honor of being the first steel tug on the Great Lakes, the Sport was launched in 1873 from Wyandotte, Michigan. At 57 feet, she was small but powerful. All in all, she saw well over four decades of faithful service on the Great Lakes while operated by multiple owners. She met...

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Named after the wife of Canada’s Governor General, the Lady Elgin was built in Buffalo, New York in 1851. An imposing sight at 252 feet long, she saw service as one of the most elegantly appointed sidewheel passenger ships of the time. Catering to the rich and famous, the Lady served faithfully for...

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With a length of 201 feet and a beam of just over 33 feet, the Wells Burt was launched proudly by the Detroit Dry Dock Company in 1873. With her size and capacity...she had the ability to carry 50,000 bushels of corn! The Wells Burt saw duty as a bulk carrier on the...

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A proud product of the Buffalo shipbuilding industry in the 19th century, the Louisville was launched in 1853 with a length of 137 feet. While working as a liner for Northern Transportation, the Louisville caught fire while on a short voyage from St. Joseph, Michigan to Chicago. The fire spread quickly requiring a...

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Rumored to be the only five master on the Great Lakes, the David Dows was launched from Toledo, Ohio with a wieldy 265 feet in length. Often said as the largest schooner on the Great Lakes at the time, her owners found her often too large for regular service. With that, much of...

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A product of the Benton Harbor, Michigan shipbuilding industry, the Tacoma was launched in 1894. She is a tug that was just over 76 feet in length with a beam of 18 feet and registered at 76 gross tons. She served proudly on Lake Michigan for nearly 40 years as a dredge tug...

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A proud product of the Buffalo shipbuilding industry, this beautiful schooner was launched just before the Civil War in 1855. With her svelte design and length of 130 feet, she cut through the Great Lakes waters like a sharp knife through warm butter. Sadly, just over a decade later, in 1866, she was...

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