The Fred Lee was built in Port Huron, Michigan in 1896. She went down with all hands on Friday November the 13th of 1936. She is a small tug at only 70 feet in length. This intact site features many artifacts including steam whistles, an anchor, winch as well as the ships wheel.

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Built and launched in 1868 from Cleveland, Ohio, the St. Albans was a proud steam screw with a length of 136 feet and a beam of 26 feet. She saw just over a decade of service hauling passengers and cargo throughout the southern Great Lakes. In January of 1881, the St. Albans was...

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Launched in 1855, the E.P. Dorr was a lumbering tug, constructed of wood and 161 feet long with a substantial weight of 300 tons. Sadly after only a year of faithful service, she met her fate in the summer of 1856 during a collision with the steamer, Oliver Cromwell. Despite sinking in a...

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Built in 1846 and owned/operated by E.B. Ward, the Detroit was a sidewheel paddle steamer that was primarily used by a company in building the Sault Saint Marie Canal. She served diligently for 8 years until she met her fate in a collision with the sailing ship, Nucleus. The day the...

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Launched in 1846 as a wooden bulk freight steamer, the City of Detroit served her owners dutifully on Lake Huron until she ultimately met her fate on a cold December day, nearly 30 years later. On that fateful night, the City of Detroit was caught in a storm and foundered, sinking with all...

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Built and launched in 1883 at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, the Emma Neilsen was a three masted schooner with a length of 75 feet, a beam of 20 feet and a gross weight of 63 tons. She served the Great Lakes proudly for nearly three decades, supporting the shipping and commerce industries in the area....

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This 240 foot wooden freighter was lost in a collision with the steamer Uranus during a thick fog on August 19, 1906. She came to rest in 175 feet of water upright and mostly intact. The Gov. Smith is an amazing wreck for the intrepid technical diver to explore. We visit the Gov....

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Launched in 1906, as a bulk freighter, the Daniel J. Morrell was an imposing sight, especially for the time. At a heavyweight 608 feet in length and weighing in well north of 7000 tons, the Morrell was designed to haul the largest loads on the Great Lakes. She served faithfully for over 60...

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Built and launched in 1846, the Albany was a steel steamer, 267 feet in length. She served the Great Lakes shipping industry proudly for nearly five decades until she collided with the Philadelphia in 1893. She survived the collision and was taken under tow to port for repairs. While under tow, she foundered...

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The Arctic was a wooden steamer that went down in 1893 when it sprang a leak that overwhelmed its pumps and crew efforts. She came to rest in 130 feet of water upright and intact. She has a distinctive look and is a real treat for the advanced recreational diver to explore. We...

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