Learn About The Great lakes Shipwrecks That We Dive!

With almost 50 Great Lakes shipwrecks, Double Action Dive Charters can accommodate divers of all levels and experience. Not a certified diver? You can take a course through Dive Right in Scuba and do your check out dives on one of the beginner shipwrecks that we visit regularly!

I'm new to the Great Lakes. What should I dive? (20-50 feet deep)
This 240 foot long self-loading barge was built in 1929. Her unique design allowed her to travel under the bridges of Chicago without them being raised. She sank during a storm in 1936, and today she sits upright in 30 feet of water. The MSB was lost off the SouthMaterial Services Barge Chicago lighthouse and was carrying sand. It was foundered in a heavy gale, and was not designed to withstand open lake environments. In the end, roughly 15 to 22 lives were lost in the event. Sunk: July 29, 1936 Depth: 22-38 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip        Book Now!
Built in 1895, she sank in 40 feet of water 3 miles from the Calumet City lighthouse. She capsized when overtaken by a northeast gale wind on September 29, 1906, off the entrance to the Chicago Harbor. The large amount of water in the holds caused the center of gravity to shift with each wave. The Ames and a second tug, the Perfection, returned to help the ferry. She gave a sudden lurch, began recovering, and then flipped clean over. She took the lives of 6 of her crew with her. Her cargo consisted of 28 railroad cars sitting on 4 tracks. They were also loaded with iron ore, telegraph poles and lumber. Although difficult to find, this 300′ long wreck is still interesting and well worth seeing. It was a fatal decision. The barge continued to list to port. The Ames and a second tug, the Perfection, returned to rescue the barge. She gave a sudden lurch, started to recover, then flipped clean over. Sunk: September 29, 1906 Depth: 42 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip      Book Now!
At the time of her sinking in 1907, the Illinois was the largest hydraulic dredge on the Lake. Today she rests in 35 feet of water near another dive site, the Holly Barge, Chicago’s first intentional shipwreck. The Illinois was a tug guided sand dredge. There is a pile of plates and general Illinois and Holly Bargewreckage mess including a large centrifugal pump lying at an oblique angle. There is a slightly spooky feel at night, simply because of the amount of wreckage and yet no life or seaweed around it. There is a newly sunk barge nearby, the Holly Barge, sunk specifically for divers. This wreck is upright and in excellent condition. It is possible to penetrate inside. Sunk: 1920s/1930s & May 6, 2000 (respectively) Depth: 24-33 Feet  $110 for a 2 tank trip       Book Now!
The Flora was built in 1875 in Milwaukee and has a length of 174 feet. It was lost on November 14, 1912 in a harbor in Chicago. Thankfully, there was no loss of life. Crushed by ice in Nov. of 1912, she lies in 28 feet of water. In 1913 she was dynamited by the Army Corps because she posed a hazard to navigation. At the time of her sinking, her cargo was a load of automotive lamps made of solid brass. Some remain to Flora M. Hillbe found among the wreckage; spend a lot of time digging around and you may be lucky to find one – but put them back – looking only, no souvenir hunting allowed! Essentially, she was crushed, blown up and became a debris field. Sunk: November 14, 1912 Depth: 36 Feet  $130 for a 2 tank trip       Book Now!
The schooner ship was built in 1855 in Buffalo with a length of 130 feet. It was lost on May 12, 1866, 6 miles northeast of the Chicago River mouth. It now rests roughly 50 feet below water. On a dark night, the Wings of Wind collided with the H.P. Baldwin due to a lack of visual with one Wings of Windanother, and sank. The bark of the Baldwin crushed the side of the schooner, but fortunately the crew of the Wings was able to escape in her yawl before sinking. Sunk: May 12, 1866 Depth: 40-45 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip Book Now!
Sunk: November 4, 1929 Depth: 27-35 Feet  $110 for a 2 tank trip     Book Now!
   

 

I'm new to the Great Lakes. What should I dive? (20-50 feet deep)
  • Material Service Barge-Sunk: July 29, 1936 Depth: 22-38 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Tacoma-Sunk: November 4, 1929 Depth: 27-35 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Car Ferry #2-Sunk: September 29, 1906 Depth: 42 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Illinois and Holly Barges-Sunk: 1920s/1930s & May 6, 2000 Depth: 24-33 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Flora M. Hill-Sunk: November 14, 1912 Depth: 36 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • Wings of the Wind-Sunk: May 12, 1866 Depth: 40-45 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
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I've been on the lakes. Show me more! (40-90 feet deep)
Built in 1881 in Toledo with a length of 265 feet, this schooner was transporting coal on its last voyage. Thankfully, there was no loss of life in the incident. She was lost on November 25, 1889. While towing steamer Aurora with barge Adams and bound for Chicago, the Dows broke her back on a series of big waves during a storm and went down in 42 feet of water. Her 5 masts wereDavid Dows emergent after sinking and became a serious navigational problem for vessels approaching Chicago, until winter ice removed them. The hull has been partly removed in 1908, but remains are a frequent dive target. Dows is reportedly the largest and most capacious schooner in the world when built, but her various owners found her impractical. She was thus used mostly as a towed barge and probably the only 5-master ever built on the lakes. Sunk: November 30, 1889 Depth: 40-45 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip Book Now!
The Louisville was built in 1853 in Buffalo with a length of 137 feet. She had a short life afloat sinking on September 29, 1857 off Calumet, Illinois. Fire was discovered in her cargo hold approximately amidships. Even though she had to be abandoned quickly, of herLouisville crew and the fifteen passengers aboard, only one died, a fireman who was lost when one of her lifeboats capsized. She burned to a total loss. The Northern Transportation Liner was bound for St. Joseph, Michigan from Chicago. She now rests in a depth of 60 feet below water. Sunk: February 2, 1893 Depth: 60 feet $110 for a 2 tank trip Book Now!
The Buccaneer is a 100 foot long patrol boat with a 23 foot beam that served from 1925 to 1936. This was one of 13 patrol boats armed with a 23-caliber gun constructed for the U.S. Coast Guard to be used against rum runners in the Great Lakes and the Gulf of BuccaneerMexico. After the ships retirement from patrolling the waters, it ended its working career as a pirate-themed charter craft that could be hired anytime for a party by calling 1-800-PARTY-BOAT. The Buccaneer has been sunk and now rests below 72 feet of water 10 miles off Chicago. Sunk: June 18, 2010 Depth: 72 Feet $130 for a 2 tank tripBook Now!
The Rotarian was built in 1889 in Sandusky, Ohio. It was approximately 147 feet long with a beam of 27 feet. The vessel spent many years as a passenger excursion ship. When it moved to Chicago in the 1920’s, this aging vessel was used successively as a dance hall, the home of the Cook County Democrats, and as a restaurant that offered illegal bootleg alcohol during Prohibition. Even Al Capone Rotarianentertained on this ship. After sinking at its dock, the Rotarian was raised and towed out into Lake Michigan on Sept. 28, 1931, and scuttled. The wreck lies at 84 feet with much to see: boiler, the collapsed hull, its propeller, and, amidst the hull timbers, numerous beer bottles from Prohibition days. Sunk: September 28, 1931 Depth: 80-84 Feet $130 for a 2 tank tripBook Now!
The historic Great Lakes steamship STRAITS OF MACKINAC arrived in Chicago on Tuesday June 25th, from Kewaunee Wisconsin. Slated to be sunk at a location Northeast of Navy Pier as an artificial reef and recreational site for scuba divers. The purpose of sinking the 200 foot long coal-fired car ferry is to increase recreational tourism to Chicago and also by providing an attractive habitat for perch,Straights of Mackinac bass and other native species. The ship will enhance Chicago’s sport fishing industry and add a new, intact shipwreck that will make the Straits of Mackinac the first substantial wreck in Chicago waters since 1929. The purpose of sinking the 200 foot long coal-fired car ferry is to increase recreational tourism to Chicago and also by providing an attractive habitat for perch, bass and other native species. The ship will enhance Chicago’s sport fishing industry and add a new, intact shipwreck that will make the Straits of Mackinac the first substantial wreck in Chicago waters since 1929. Sunk: April 10, 2003 Depth: 42-80 Feet $130 for a 2 tank tripBook Now!
The Wells Burt was built by the Detroit Dry Dock Co. and launched in 1873 as a bulk carrier. Her length reached 201 feet with a beam of 33.5 feet. Her hold was over 14 feet of depth and could carry about 50,000 bushels of corn. She only served for 10 years on the Great Lakes. A furious storm took its toll on the ship while en route from Buffalo to Chicago with a load of coal. The storm was so powerful that the residents of Chicago reported an upward spraying of over 100 feet. The steering gear was disabled and the ship was forced to submit to the strength of the storm. In the end, all eleven crew members perished. Over one hundred years after sinking, in 1988, professional divers notified the Underwater Archaeological Society that they had discovered the sunken ship. This wreck is unique to Chicago shipwrecks, as the Wells Burt is almost completely intact. She now rests at a depth of 40 feet. Sunk: May 20, 1883 Depth: 38-45 Feet $130 for a 2 tank tripBook Now!
On September 7, 1860 however the atmosphere aboard the refurbished Lady Elgin was festive. On board were 350 passengers, and 35 crew members bound for Milwaukee. Sometime between 10 and 11pm, the ship departed Chicago where most of her passengers had listened earlier that day to a presidential campaign speech by Stephen A. Douglas. As the ship steamed against heavy northeast winds, a Lady ElginGerman brass band entertained everyone on board. By 2:30 in the morning on September 8, they were approximately 16 miles north of Chicago. Many passengers were asleep in their staterooms, although accounts say that some were still dancing to the band. Outside however the sailors had to contend with heavy thunderstorms, gale force winds, and the sudden appearance of a small schooner called the Augusta. Although the Lady Elgin was brightly lit, the Augusta was dark, making her difficult to see at night in a squall. And due to the heavy winds, her speed was eleven knots per hour. A coroner’s inquest later revealed that the Augusta’s second mate had seen the lights of the passenger steamer thirty minutes before the accident, but no attempt to correct course was taken for another twenty minutes. Sunk: September 8, 1860 Depth: 55 Feet Call for pricing Book Now!
I've been on the lakes before. Show me more! (40-90 feet deep)
  • David Dows-Sunk: November 30, 1889 Depth: 40-45 Feet $110 for a 2 tank dive
  • Louisville-Sunk: February 2, 1893 Depth: 60 feet $110 for a 2 tank dive
  • Buccaneer-Sunk: June 18, 2010 Depth: 72 Feet $130 for a 2 tank dive
  • Rotarian-Sunk: September 28, 1931 Depth: 80-84 Feet $130 for a 2 tank dive
  • Straits of Mackinac-Sunk: April 10, 2003 Depth: 42-80 Feet $130 for a 2 tank dive
  • Wells Burt-Sunk: May 20, 1883 Depth: 38-45 Feet $130 for a 2 tank dive
  • Lady Elgin-Sunk: September 8, 1860 Depth: 55 Feet Call for Pricing
Book Now!
I have technical and/or deep wreck experience. I'm ready for a challenge! (90-195 feet deep)
The Thomas Hume, which was operating in the lumber industry, transported lumber from Muskegon to Chicago. One day, the schooner went missing with six men aboard during a squall on Lake Michigan on May 21, 1891. Among many theories that aroseThomas Hume over the time of the disappearance was that the captain sailed to another port, re-painted the Thomas Hume and took it for his own. Another theory was that a much larger steamer ran down the schooner and the steamer’s captain swore his crew to secrecy. Sunk: May 21, 1891 Depth: 145 Feet $180 for a 2 tank tripBook Now!
SS. Wisconsin was originally launched in 1881. At the time, she was one of the most lavish and technologically advanced steamers of her day. She was one of the first iron-hulled vessels on the Great Lakes and marked a turning pointing in ship construction. SS Wisconsin underwent several name changes and overhauls during her service. Her original name had been returned to her prior to her Wisconsinsinking on October 27, 1929, the night before the 1929 Wall Street crash. SS Wisconsin sunk off from Kenosha, Wisconsin, while making a run to Milwaukee. She was was caught in a heavy gale that resulted in her taking on water. All but nine of her crew were able to abandon ship before she sunk. Her captain was retrieved from the water alive but died a short time later from exposure. SS Wisconsin now lies fully upright in 130 of water off Kenosha. Her deck rises about 30 feet off the lake bottom, and she is fully intact. Typically visibility is good on this wreck, making it a favorite for advanced recreational Great Lakes divers. Sunk: October 29, 1929 Depth: 90-130 Feet $90 for a 2 tank tripBook Now!
Sunk: April 18, 1928 Depth: 195 FeetRosinco $180 for a 2 tank trip Book Now!
I have technical/deep experience. I want a challenge! (90-195 feet deep)
  • Thomas Hume-Sunk: May 21, 1891 Depth: 145 Feet $180 for a 2 tank trip
  • Wisconsin-Sunk: October 29, 1929 Depth: 90-130 Feet $90 for a 2 tank trip
  • Rosinco-Sunk: April 18, 1928 Depth: 195 Feet $180 for a 2 tank trip
Book Now!
Show me the wrecks from Hammond Marina!
This 240 foot long self-loading barge was built in 1929. Her unique design allowed her to travel under the bridges of Chicago without them being raised. She sank during a storm in 1936, and today she sits upright in 30 feet of water. The MSB was lost off the SouthMaterial Services Barge Chicago lighthouse and was carrying sand. It was foundered in a heavy gale, and was not designed to withstand open lake environments. In the end, roughly 15 to 22 lives were lost in the event. Sunk: July 29, 1936 Depth: 22-38 Feet         Book Now!
Built in 1895, she sank in 40 feet of water 3 miles from the Calumet City lighthouse. She capsized when overtaken by a northeast gale wind on September 29, 1906, off the entrance to the Chicago Harbor. The large amount of water in the holds caused the center of gravity to shift with each wave. The Ames and a second tug, the Perfection, returned to help the ferry. She gave a sudden lurch, began recovering, and then flipped clean over. She took the lives of 6 of her crew with her. Her cargo consisted of 28 railroad cars sitting on 4 tracks. They were also loaded with iron ore, telegraph poles and lumber. Although difficult to find, this 300′ long wreck is still interesting and well worth seeing. It was a fatal decision. The barge continued to list to port. The Ames and a second tug, the Perfection, returned to rescue the barge. She gave a sudden lurch, started to recover, then flipped clean over. Sunk: September 29, 1906 Depth: 42 Feet         Book Now!
At the time of her sinking in 1907, the Illinois was the largest hydraulic dredge on the Lake. Today she rests in 35 feet of water near another dive site, the Holly Barge, Chicago’s first intentional shipwreck. The Illinois was a tug guided sand dredge. There is a pile of plates and general Illinois and Holly Bargewreckage mess including a large centrifugal pump lying at an oblique angle. There is a slightly spooky feel at night, simply because of the amount of wreckage and yet no life or seaweed around it. There is a newly sunk barge nearby, the Holly Barge, sunk specifically for divers. This wreck is upright and in excellent condition. It is possible to penetrate inside. Sunk: 1920s/1930s & May 6, 2000 (respectively) Depth: 24-33 Feet         Book Now!
The Flora was built in 1875 in Milwaukee and has a length of 174 feet. It was lost on November 14, 1912 in a harbor in Chicago. Thankfully, there was no loss of life. Crushed by ice in Nov. of 1912, she lies in 28 feet of water. In 1913 she was dynamited by the Army Corps because she posed a hazard to navigation. At the time of her sinking, her cargo was a load of automotive lamps made of solid brass. Some remain to Flora M. Hillbe found among the wreckage; spend a lot of time digging around and you may be lucky to find one – but put them back – looking only, no souvenir hunting allowed! Essentially, she was crushed, blown up and became a debris field. Sunk: November 14, 1912 Depth: 36 Feet         Book Now!
The schooner ship was built in 1855 in Buffalo with a length of 130 feet. It was lost on May 12, 1866, 6 miles northeast of the Chicago River mouth. It now rests roughly 50 feet below water. On a dark night, the Wings of Wind collided with the H.P. Baldwin due to a lack of visual with one Wings of Windanother, and sank. The bark of the Baldwin crushed the side of the schooner, but fortunately the crew of the Wings was able to escape in her yawl before sinking. Sunk: May 12, 1866 Depth: 40-45 Feet Book Now!
Sunk: November 4, 1929 Depth: 27-35 Feet       Book Now!
Built in 1881 in Toledo with a length of 265 feet, this schooner was transporting coal on its last voyage. Thankfully, there was no loss of life in the incident. She was lost on November 25, 1889. While towing steamer Aurora with barge Adams and bound for Chicago, the Dows broke her back on a series of big waves during a storm and went down in 42 feet of water. Her 5 masts wereDavid Dows emergent after sinking and became a serious navigational problem for vessels approaching Chicago, until winter ice removed them. The hull has been partly removed in 1908, but remains are a frequent dive target. Dows is reportedly the largest and most capacious schooner in the world when built, but her various owners found her impractical. She was thus used mostly as a towed barge and probably the only 5-master ever built on the lakes. Sunk: November 30, 1889 Depth: 40-45 Feet Book Now!
The Louisville was built in 1853 in Buffalo with a length of 137 feet. She had a short life afloat sinking on September 29, 1857 off Calumet, Illinois. Fire was discovered in her cargo hold approximately amidships. Even though she had to be abandoned quickly, of herLouisville crew and the fifteen passengers aboard, only one died, a fireman who was lost when one of her lifeboats capsized. She burned to a total loss. The Northern Transportation Liner was bound for St. Joseph, Michigan from Chicago. She now rests in a depth of 60 feet below water. Sunk: February 2, 1893 Depth: 60 feet Book Now!
The Buccaneer is a 100 foot long patrol boat with a 23 foot beam that served from 1925 to 1936. This was one of 13 patrol boats armed with a 23-caliber gun constructed for the U.S. Coast Guard to be used against rum runners in the Great Lakes and the Gulf of BuccaneerMexico. After the ships retirement from patrolling the waters, it ended its working career as a pirate-themed charter craft that could be hired anytime for a party by calling 1-800-PARTY-BOAT. The Buccaneer has been sunk and now rests below 72 feet of water 10 miles off Chicago. Sunk: June 18, 2010 Depth: 72 Feet Book Now!
The Rotarian was built in 1889 in Sandusky, Ohio. It was approximately 147 feet long with a beam of 27 feet. The vessel spent many years as a passenger excursion ship. When it moved to Chicago in the 1920’s, this aging vessel was used successively as a dance hall, the home of the Cook County Democrats, and as a restaurant that offered illegal bootleg alcohol during Prohibition. Even Al Capone Rotarianentertained on this ship. After sinking at its dock, the Rotarian was raised and towed out into Lake Michigan on Sept. 28, 1931, and scuttled. The wreck lies at 84 feet with much to see: boiler, the collapsed hull, its propeller, and, amidst the hull timbers, numerous beer bottles from Prohibition days. Sunk: September 28, 1931 Depth: 80-84 Feet Book Now!
The historic Great Lakes steamship STRAITS OF MACKINAC arrived in Chicago on Tuesday June 25th, from Kewaunee Wisconsin. Slated to be sunk at a location Northeast of Navy Pier as an artificial reef and recreational site for scuba divers. The purpose of sinking the 200 foot long coal-fired car ferry is to increase recreational tourism to Chicago and also by providing an attractive habitat for perch,Straights of Mackinac bass and other native species. The ship will enhance Chicago’s sport fishing industry and add a new, intact shipwreck that will make the Straits of Mackinac the first substantial wreck in Chicago waters since 1929. The purpose of sinking the 200 foot long coal-fired car ferry is to increase recreational tourism to Chicago and also by providing an attractive habitat for perch, bass and other native species. The ship will enhance Chicago’s sport fishing industry and add a new, intact shipwreck that will make the Straits of Mackinac the first substantial wreck in Chicago waters since 1929. Sunk: April 10, 2003 Depth: 42-80 FeetBook Now!
The Wells Burt was built by the Detroit Dry Dock Co. and launched in 1873 as a bulk carrier. Her length reached 201 feet with a beam of 33.5 feet. Her hold was over 14 feet of depth and could carry about 50,000 bushels of corn. She only served for 10 years on the Great Lakes. A furious storm took its toll on the ship while en route from Buffalo to Chicago with a load of coal. The storm was so powerful that the residents of Chicago reported an upward spraying of over 100 feet. The steering gear was disabled and the ship was forced to submit to the strength of the storm. In the end, all eleven crew members perished. Over one hundred years after sinking, in 1988, professional divers notified the Underwater Archaeological Society that they had discovered the sunken ship. This wreck is unique to Chicago shipwrecks, as the Wells Burt is almost completely intact. She now rests at a depth of 40 feet. Sunk: May 20, 1883 Depth: 38-45 Feet Book Now!
On September 7, 1860 however the atmosphere aboard the refurbished Lady Elgin was festive. On board were 350 passengers, and 35 crew members bound for Milwaukee. Sometime between 10 and 11pm, the ship departed Chicago where most of her passengers had listened earlier that day to a presidential campaign speech by Stephen A. Douglas. As the ship steamed against heavy northeast winds, a Lady ElginGerman brass band entertained everyone on board. By 2:30 in the morning on September 8, they were approximately 16 miles north of Chicago. Many passengers were asleep in their staterooms, although accounts say that some were still dancing to the band. Outside however the sailors had to contend with heavy thunderstorms, gale force winds, and the sudden appearance of a small schooner called the Augusta. Although the Lady Elgin was brightly lit, the Augusta was dark, making her difficult to see at night in a squall. And due to the heavy winds, her speed was eleven knots per hour. A coroner’s inquest later revealed that the Augusta’s second mate had seen the lights of the passenger steamer thirty minutes before the accident, but no attempt to correct course was taken for another twenty minutes. Sunk: September 8, 1860 Depth: 55 FeetBook Now!
The Thomas Hume, which was operating in the lumber industry, transported lumber from Muskegon to Chicago. One day, the schooner went missing with six men aboard during a squall on Lake Michigan on May 21, 1891. Among many theories that aroseThomas Hume over the time of the disappearance was that the captain sailed to another port, re-painted the Thomas Hume and took it for his own. Another theory was that a much larger steamer ran down the schooner and the steamer’s captain swore his crew to secrecy. Sunk: May 21, 1891 Depth: 145 Feet Book Now!
   
Show me the wrecks from Hammond Marina!
  • Material Service Barge-Sunk: July 29, 1936 Depth: 22-38 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Tacoma-Sunk: November 4, 1929 Depth: 27-35 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Car Ferry #2-Sunk: September 29, 1906 Depth: 42 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Illinois and Holly Barges-Sunk: 1920s/1930s & May 6, 2000 Depth: 24-33 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Flora M. Hill-Sunk: November 14, 1912 Depth: 36 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • Wings of the Wind-Sunk: May 12, 1866 Depth: 40-45 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • David Dows-Sunk: November 30, 1889 Depth: 40-45 Feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Louisville-Sunk: February 2, 1893 Depth: 60 feet $110 for a 2 tank trip
  • Buccaneer-Sunk: June 18, 2010 Depth: 72 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • Rotarian-Sunk: September 28, 1931 Depth: 80-84 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • Straits of Mackinac-Sunk: April 10, 2003 Depth: 42-80 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • Wells Burt-Sunk: May 20, 1883 Depth: 38-45 Feet $130 for a 2 tank trip
  • Lady Elgin-Sunk: September 8, 1860 Depth: 55 Feet Call for Pricing
  • Thomas Hume-Sunk: May 21, 1891 Depth: 145 Feet $180 for a 2 tank trip
Book Now!
Show me the wrecks from Northpoint Marina!
SS. Wisconsin was originally launched in 1881. At the time, she was one of the most lavish and technologically advanced steamers of her day. She was one of the first iron-hulled vessels on the Great Lakes and marked a turning pointing in ship construction. SS Wisconsin underwent several name changes and overhauls during her service. Her original name had been returned to her prior to her Wisconsinsinking on October 27, 1929, the night before the 1929 Wall Street crash. SS Wisconsin sunk off from Kenosha, Wisconsin, while making a run to Milwaukee. She was was caught in a heavy gale that resulted in her taking on water. All but nine of her crew were able to abandon ship before she sunk. Her captain was retrieved from the water alive but died a short time later from exposure. SS Wisconsin now lies fully upright in 130 of water off Kenosha. Her deck rises about 30 feet off the lake bottom, and she is fully intact. Typically visibility is good on this wreck, making it a favorite for advanced recreational Great Lakes divers. Sunk: October 29, 1929 Depth: 90-130 Feet Book Now!
Sunk: April 18, 1928 Depth: 195 FeetRosinco Book Now!
Show me the wrecks from Northpoint Marina!
  • Wisconsin-Sunk: October 29, 1929 Depth: 90-130 Feet $90 for a 2 tank trip
  • Rosinco-Sunk: April 18, 1928 Depth: 195 Feet $180 for a 2 tank trip
Book Now!
Show me the wrecks from Sanilac Shores Underwater Preserve!
Built in 1907, the 250 foot long steel freighter Regina fell prey to the "The Great Storm" of November 9, 1913 and went missing with all hands. She was undiscovered until 1986. Since she was located, she has become a very popular dive site. The ship rests upside down on the bottom in about 80 feet of water. There is a 56 foot hole in the hull that permits entry to the hold area by qualified divers. Some of her cargo can be found scattered on the lake floor.
This small tugboat is a favorite among divers. She was built in 1873 and is important as the first steel tug on the Great Lakes. She had a long career as a working tug on the Lakes, but at 57 feet she was no match for a severe gale on December 13, 1920. Her steel hull rests upright with a slight list to starboard. She rests in 25 to 50 feet of water
The Checotah was built in 1870 as a schooner and actually sank two times. The first was in 1882. She was raised and converted to a scow in 1888. While in tow on October 30, 1906, she began to founder and sank off Forestville. Today, she resides in 117 feet of water with her stern broken and scattered. The bow is intact with much equipment present as well as artifacts distributed about the wreck.
This wooden steamer was launched at Buffalo in 1856 and was lost to heavy seas on October 14, 1876. She lies physically close to the Checotah at a similar depth of 117 feet and is upright but very broken up. Her unique oscillating steam engines are exposed to view and are of special interest to maritime specialists and divers. Part of a wooden "hogging arch" is still in place. She has many tools and much gear present.
The Mary Alice B was built at Duluth, Minnesota in 1931 for the Corps of Engineers as the "Quintus". In 1962 she passed into private ownership and her name was changed. She was a fair sized working tugboat at 62 feet in length. She foundered off Port Sanilac September 5, 1975. She is upright and intact in 92 feet of water. Her wheelhouse with her wheel still in place can be penetrated.
The North Star was lost after a collision in the fog with her sister ship, the Northern Queen. A steel hulled, 300 foot long package freighter, she was launched in 1889. On November 25, 1908 she was bound for Duluth with a load of grain and shingles when she was struck and sank southeast of Port Sanilac. She rests in about 100 feet of water in two pieces. Her pilothouse is intact and her engine and boilers are in place.
The Williams was carrying a cargo of coal when the 110 foot schooner was lost in 1864. Some of her equipment like a large stock anchor was removed before the law was changed to prohibit the removal of artifacts. She sits upright with her hull mostly intact. The exception is the stern that has collapsed. Divers can visit her in about 84 feet of water and see her hatches, a stove, bilge pump, two winches and a large windlass.
The Strong was a 205 foot wooden steamer built in 1874. During her life she sank three times. On the first two occasions she was raised and placed back in service. The final time came on October 26, 1904 when she caught fire off Lexington and burned to the waterline.
Wooden Schooner barge F.B. Gardner 177 feet long, Caught fire in 1904 and burned to a total loss. Her ribs, huge windlass, and other equipment are the sites highlights. She is in 55 feet of water
The wooden steamer Canisteo, launched in 1886 was 191 feet long. She was burned and scuttled in 1920. The wreck site includes a large four bladed propeller, hull planking, and framing. Other small items are in the wreckage as well such as small tools, and a milk can.
The price, a 504 foot long steel freighter was victim of the Great Storm of 1913. The wreck lies upside down between 45 and 75 feet of water. There is a large debris field, and lots of artifacts scattered at the site. Her propeller and rudder are other highlights of the wreck site.
The 130 foot long three masted schooner John Breden was built in 1862. She was reduced to a tow barge in her later years. in 1899, she was loaded with twice her rated carrying capacity, her seams opened up and she foundered. She rests in 51 feet of water, and is broken into large pieces with a large debris field. The anchors, windlass, and ships wheel are the sites highlights.
Show me the wrecks from Harbor Beach!
The schooner Dunderburg was launched in 1867. She sank off Harbor Beach after a collision on August 13, 1868. She rests fully intact in 155 feet of water. A unique, extremely well preserved figurehead adorns her bow and her cargo of grain is still sitting in her holds.
The oldest known wreck in the Preserve is the Goliath, a package and bulk freighter. She exploded and burned on September 13, 1848. Her main features are an upright engine, boiler, stove and unique early propellers. They can be examined in about 104 feet of water.
The "The Great Storm" of November 9, 1913 claimed the large steel freighter John McGean. She was lost with all hands and now rests upside down in 195 feet of water.
The 356 foot steel freighter, Glenorchy collided in a dense fog with the steamer Leonard Miller and sank in 110 feet of water. The wreck lies upside down and penetration is possible for properly trained and prepared divers.
The 139 foot, two masted schooner went down in a gale with a cargo of coal in 1895 coming to rest in 210 feet of water. She is upright and intact. Complete with a standing mast, crows nest, windlass, and anchors.
At 250 feet long she was the largest sailing vessel on the lakes. The four masted schooner built in 1890 she went down in a fall gale in 1905 with all 8 hands. She is upright and beautifully intact in 210 feet of water.
Wooden steamer Arctic, sprang a leak and sank in 130 feet of water with no lives lost. Mostly intact with her engine, and gauges being the ships highlights.
The 236-foot steamer Philadelphia was built in 1868. She was lost in a collision with the steamer Albany on November 7, 1893. She is upright in 120 feet of water. The wreck is mostly intact with her cargo of heating and cooking stoves resting on the deck and scattered on the lake floor next to the hull.
The 267 foot steel steamer Albany was launched in 1846. She survived the collision with the Philadelphia on November 7, 1893 and was taken in tow. However, she foundered while undertow and came to rest close by the Philadelphia in 140 feet of water. She lies broken with her stern upright and her bow resting on its starboard side.
This large freighter was lost in a storm on November 29, 1966. The Morrell is famous for having broken into two sections with her bow coming to rest in 200 feet of water. Her stern remained under power after the loss of the bow and continued on for another 6 miles before settling into 218 feet of water. The wreck's portions lie just north of the Preserve boundary. The wreck is perfectly intact, with all of the details still evident.
This 240 foot long wooden steamer foundered after colliding with the steamer Uranus, on August 19, 1906. She is up right and mostly intact in 175 feet of water.
Wooden tug 101 foot long, sitting upright and intact She foundered after a stern bearing gave way, breaking the stern pipe She came to rest in 100 feet of water.
The huge 300 ton, wooden tug, measuring 161 foot long. She collided with the steamer Oliver Cromwell in 1856. She is upright and intact in 170 feet of water.
The Neilson was a three masted schooner measuring 98 feet long. Launched in 1883, she sank in a collision with the steel steamer Wyandotte in 1911. Today she rests upright and completely intact in 200 feet of water.
The 157 foot side-wheel steamer Detroit sank in a collision in the fog with the bark Nucleus on May 25th, 1854. The wreck sits upright and mostly intact in 200 feet of water. Her engine, side-wheels, deck machinery, anchors and the ships bell are all highlights of the wreck.
The wooden bulk freighter City of Detroit 167 feet long foundered in a storm in December 1873. All 20 hands went down with the ship, and the wreck is upright and intact in 175 feet of water.

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Lake Michigan Shipwrecks